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AMD Server Market Share Grows from 1% to nearly 10% in just 2 Years

AMD’s server market share has soared from just 1% to 8% in a span of just two years. This was disclosed in a corporate presentation the other day. Thanks to the 2nd Gen Epyc Rome processors, Team Red was able to nearly double its server share in 2019, going from 5% to 8% with further growth expected in the following months.

AMD is poised to launch the 3rd Gen Epyc Milan CPUs in the fourth quarter of 2020 which is expected to propel the company’s shares to as much as 15% in the coming months. More and more Data Centers are adopting Team Red’s server chips for their better price-performance ratio and higher core counts, as well as the efficiency that comes with TSMC’s 7nm node.

Milan is set to bring about an IPC gain of around 15%+, bringing considerable improvements in raw performance. The core count is expected to stay the same, topping out at 64, but the increase in single-threaded performance should put significant strain on Intel’s server segment, considering their lower thread counts. The recent launch of the EPYC 7Fx2 series was the first step in the same direction. These chips offer considerably better single-threaded performance than other Epyc chips by doubling down on clocks and cache memory. We can expect the same trend to continue with Milan.

The client notebook market has also seen rapid gains in 2019, and this is pre-Renoir we’re talking about here. With the launch of the Ryzen 4000 based laptops, we can expect Team Red’s share to cross the 30% mark by the end of 2020.

Lastly, the OEM market, another Intel-centric space also saw healthy growth in AMD’s favor, with a 3% increase in 2019. This is relatively tame compared to the kind of figures expected in 2020, thanks to Renoir mobile and desktop chips. Overall, 2020 looks to be one of AMD’s best years ever, across all markets. With Zen 3 based Milan and Vermeer chips expected soon, it’ll be Open Season soon!

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!
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