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AMD Ryzen CPU Market share Hits 60% in Korea; Notebook CPU Share Grows to 10 Year High

Ever since the Ryzen 3000 CPUs debuted, AMD’s been retaking the desktop market from Intel across the globe. While in some regions like Germany, the results have been skewed heavily in AMD’s favor, other countries are taking their time to renounce Intel’s dated 14nm chips. China, Japan, and Korea are part of the latter.

In April, more than 90% of CPUs sold at Germany retailer Mindfactory were Ryzen chips.

Both Japan and South Korea have started to turn in AMD’s favor, but China is a more complicated market. We recently did a piece on that. You can check it out here:

AMD’s Radeon RX 580 is Still the Most Popular Consumer GPU in China; Intel Leads in CPU Space

From ZDNet Korea

The latest reports from the Korean market how that AMD’s Ryzen 5 processors are leading by a fat margin against Intel’s Core i5 parts. This makes sense as the former is a better chip by every metric.

AMD Ryzen 5 3600 vs 3600X vs Intel Core i5-9600K: Performance Comparison

https://cdn.mos.cms.futurecdn.net/yyiyiQMhqpXwrFTHqnpKCF.jpg
Creds:PCWatch

As far as Japan is concerned, it’s traditionally been an AMD stronghold. Although that changed a bit with the Bulldozer lineup, Team Red is slowly and steadily regaining its lost fortunes. Last we checked with sources, the AMD CPU share in Japan hovered somewhere north of 65% in early 2020.

Last but not the least, with the launch of the Renoir notebooks, Intel is expected to lose a major chunk of its OEM market in the mobile PC space as well. In Jan 2020, Ryzen Picasso laptops accounted for 15% of all products which swelled to 23% by April. The Ryzen 4000 based devices debuted in late March, so it’s safe to say we’re yet to see the impact of the new 7nm parts. By the end of the year, AMD is expected to gain control of at least 30-40% of the notebook market. We’ll keep you updates as we hear more.

AMD’s CPU Userbase on Steam Increased by ~20% in the Last 1 Year

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!

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