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AMD Ryzen 7 5700U (Lucienne) Spotted in an Acer Laptop

Although AMD just launched its Ryzen 5000 CPUs for the desktop market, we’re already seeing the mobile counterparts in various leaks and rumors. An Acer Aspire 5 laptop, powered by a Ryzen 5 5700U APU was recently listed by Amazon Italy (via NBC):

The 5700U is expected to be a Lucienne part, utilizing the Zen 2 cores on the CPU side and a further refined version of the Vega integrated graphics. The Ryzen 5000 APU lineup is expected to consist of both Cezanne and Lucienne SKUs, with the former utilizing the Zen 3 core and the latter being based on the older Zen 2 design. You can read more about that here.

APUCodenameC/TBase/BoostiGPUL3 CacheOPN
Ryzen 7 5800UCezanne8/162GHz/4.4GHz8CUs 2GHz16MB100-0000000285
Ryzen 7 5700ULucienne8/161.8GHz/4.3GHz7CUs 1.8GHz12MB100-0000000371
Ryzen 5 5600UCezanne6/122.3GHz/4.2GHz7CUs 1.8GHz12MB00-0000000287
Ryzen 5 5500ULucienne6/122.1GHz/4GHz7CUs 1.8GHz8MB100-0000000375
Ryzen 3 5400UCezanne4/82.6GHz/4GHz6CUs
1.6GHz
8MB100-0000000288
Ryzen 3 5300ULucienne4/82.6GHz/3.85GHz6CUs 1.5GHz4MB100-0000000376

The Acer Aspire 5 laptop listed features 8GB of DDR4 memory and a 512 GB SSD. With respect to I/O, it comes with an RJ-45, 2x USB 3.1 Type-A, 1x USB 2.0 Type-A, and 1x USB 3.2 Type-C connectors. As you can see, this is supposed to be a budget offering, as is reflected by the 779 Euro price tag.

Of course, the listing has now been removed, but thanks to the above mentioned source, we have a snapshot of the same. The laptop was supposedly going to start selling in Feb 2021, once again indicating a CES 2021 launch for the Ryzen 5000 mobile APUs.

Over the last year or so, AMD has been aggressively pursuing the notebook market, gaining an all-time high market share of 22% by the end of Q3 2020. This isn’t a surprise as the portable PC market is much wider than the DIY PC segment and has a notably higher reach.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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