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AMD Ryzen 7 4800U (15W) vs Ryzen 7 4900HS (35W) 3DMark Performance Comparison

Like contemporary Intel mobility processors, AMD’s Ryzen 4000 APUs are also launching in two flavors: a low power 15W lineup for 10-14″ notebooks and a high-performance 35-45W lineup for 14-17″ gaming laptops and mobile workstations. The higher TDP of the H series chips means that they’ll be able to run at higher boost clocks and sustain these frequencies for longer. But how much of an impact will this have on the laptops’ performance in day-to-day tasks? While a definitive answer will have to wait, we do have a preliminary analysis of sorts. Let’s have a look:

Here, we have the 3DMark FireStrike score of the 15W flagship, the Ryzen 5 4800U. It scores a healthy 16,171 in the CPU physics test with a graphics score of 3,543 points.

45W H LineupCores/ThreadsBase ClockBoost ClockL2L3GPU CUsTDP
Ryzen 9 4900HS8/162900MHz4300MHz4MB8MB8CUs35W
Ryzen 9 4900H8/163100MHz4400MHz4MB8MB8CUs45W
Ryzen 7 4800H8/ 162900MHz4200MHz4MB8MB7CUs45 W
Ryzen 7 4800HS8/162900MHz4200MHz4MB8MB7CUs35 W
Ryzen 5 4600H6/123000MHz4000MHz3MB8MB6CUs45 W

The 35W flagship, the Ryzen 9 4900HS nets a much higher 21,289 points in the CPU physics test and 4,085 points in the GPU test. Both are octa-core parts with the same Vega GPU. The only difference is that the latter has a higher boost clock and TDP envelope which allows it to maintain its higher clocks for much longer.

Keep in mind that these 15W and 35W TDPs are the power draw at the boost clock. When running at peak frequencies, both chips will draw considerably more power, with the U series pegged at 25W and the H/HS lineup able to draw 50-55W when under load.

Read more:

AMD’s Ryzen 4000 Laptops are Now Available in China; R7 4800H Models Priced Same as Intel’s 9th Gen i5s

Intel Core i9-10980HK HP Mobile CPU to have a Boost Clock of 5.3GHz

AMD Ryzen 4000 “Renoir” Mobile APUs Architectural Overview: Yes, it’s Monolithic

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!

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