CPUs

AMD Ryzen 7 4700U with 8 Cores up to 4.2GHz Benchmarks Surface, 10th Gen Intel Desktop CPUs in Feb 2020

AMD has had a stellar 2020, with launches in the CPU as well as the GPU space. In the former, we saw the Ryzen 3000 parts decimate Intel’s 14nm Coffee Lake lineup. The Radeon RX 5700 series had a less dramatic launch courtesy of NVIDIA’s RTX Super launch but in the end, they managed to hold their own.

2020 is going to be another packed year for the industry with a slew of launches planned by every major player. AMD will be launching 7nm Zen 2 CPUs for the mobile market, Intel will bring the 10nm Ice Lake chips to the server space and NVIDIA will also launch their next-gen Ampere lineup based on the 7nm node.

However, that’s not it. There are a few more product families set to arrive in 2020. These are the Comet Lake-S parts from Intel, set to tackle AMD’s Ryzen 3000 lineup and the Ryzen 4000 APUs for both desktop PCs as well as laptops. Have a peek:

You are looking at the octa-core Ryzen 7 4700U with a boost clock of up to 4.2GHz. Given the U suffix, this APU is part of the low-power notebook range. It will be AMD’s first 8-core APU and as such should be a big step up from the older Ryzen 7 3700U. The accompanying Vega graphics should also feature as many as 13 Compute Units (CUs) or 832 shaders. That again is the highest core count ever found on an AMD APU.

Double the number of cores, a new microarchitecture, smaller node, and faster clocks should drastically improve the performance of Renoir over Picasso. This should put it directly in line with the 10nm Ice Lake and Tiger lake parts from Intel. Unfortunately for team blue, these are limited to quad-core designs with relatively tame clocks. At this rate, AMD will absolutely crush Intel’s mobile offerings, one of the only fronts where the blue team has managed to hold off the Ryzen storm.

In other news, Intel is planning to launch the 10th Gen Comet Lake-S lineup for desktop PCs in Feb 2020, so it shouldn’t be long before we start seeing early benchmarks. We’ll keep you posted.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.

Back to top button