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AMD Ryzen 7 4700S: PS5/XSX Die w/ 16GB GDDR6 Memory Now Avail in Retail Market

Last year, we saw Chuwi leverage the AMD A9-9820 APU in its SFF (mini-PC), the Aerobox along with the Radeon R7 350 GPU, resulting in speculations that the SoC was the same one powering Microsoft’s Xbox Series S console. While the specifications certainly did line up, due to the nature of the custom semi-business, we never quite got a confirmation. Now, another similar case has surfaced with the Ryzen 7 4700S. This SoC, much like the Xbox Series X and PS5 is based on the Zen 2 core, featuring eight cores with SMT, 16GB of GDDR6 memory, and paired with a low-end Radeon GPU, namely the RX 550 2GB (GDDR5).

The bit that immediately gives it away is the memory. Instead of standard DDR4 memory, this SoC uses 16GB of GDDR6 with no info on the memory channel configuration. As such, this could be based on the same die as the PS5 with a 256-bit memory interface or the Xbox Series X die with its hybrid 320/192-bit memory configuration.

The SoC is supposedly called “AMD Cardinal”, and fares similar to a Ryzen 7 PRO 4750G, albeit mostly on the lower-end due to the slower clock speeds.

Compared to the Intel Core i7-9750H (paired with a GeForce RTX 2060), we’re looking at a considerably faster system which manages to be 25-50% faster in various synthetic benchmarks.

The fact that the SoC uses a discrete GPU indicates that we’re most likely looking at failed dies with the integrated RDNA 2 GPU disabled, but the CPU still functional.

The CPU has a maximum boost clock of 4GHz (vs 4.4GHz/4.2GHz on the 4700G/4800U) and comes with 12MB of L3 cache which is 50% more than the 8MB on the Ryzen 7 4700G and the 4800U, once again highlighting the special nature of the SoC.

As for the GPU, we’re looking at 2GB of GDDR5 memory paired with a Vega GPU (unknown CU count, most likely 2-4) across a 64-bit bus, with the GPU core running at 1,500MHz.

Source

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different. Left late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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