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AMD Ryzen 6000 Mobile Processors to Land in Early 2022 w/ RDNA 2 Graphics [Rumor]

AMD is looking to counter Intel’s Alder Lake launch with half a dozen product launches of its own early next year. According to the well-reputed source on red hardware @Greymon (Twitter), mass production of Rembrandt has already started, and the lineup is on track for a Q1 2022 launch. If you’ve forgotten, Rembrandt will be the successor to Cezanne in the mobile processor market. Although it’ll feature the same Zen 3 core architecture, it’ll upgrade the GPU quite massively.

We’re looking at RDNA 2’s much-awaited entry in the notebook space in integrated form factor. In addition to the new graphics architecture (from GCN/Vega), Rembrandt will also increase the raw graphics compute capabilities by 50%. The top-end SKU will feature up to 12 Compute Units (768 shaders), up from 8 (512 shaders) on Cezanne and Renoir. Pair that with high-speed quad-channel DDR5/LPDDR5 memory, and you’re looking at an iGPU that more than’s at least twice as fast as the Vega part powering Cezanne/Renoir.

Rembrandt will likely be part of the Ryzen 6000 mobile lineup, and the first AMD PC chip to leverage TSMC’s 6nm node. It’ll be followed by Ryzen 7000 mobile in early 2023. The latter will upgrade the CPU core architecture to Zen 4 (5nm), but the GPU should remain largely unchanged, other than the node shrink. However, as we saw with Vega, AMD extracted significant performance out of a dated architecture by doing just that. The same should be the result with mobile RDNA 2.

As you may have surmised by now, AMD has a laser focus on the notebook PC market, with a yearly cadence and an increased supply dedicated to the lucrative segments. We will see this strategy in play in the coming years as well.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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