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AMD Ryzen 5 3600X vs Ryzen 7 3700X vs Ryzen 9 3900X Performance Tests Across 10+ Games

Gaming performance was one of the key highlights of the Ryzen 3000 processors. AMD included a much higher L3 cache with the 3rd Gen Ryzen parts, dubbed GameCache. The main reason behind it was to mask the latency induced by the CCD interconnects (Infinity Fiber), as it has an adverse effect on gaming performance. As per AMD, this resulted in a hefty 20-25% increase in performance aside from the IPC gains.

If you’re looking to buy a 3rd Gen Ryzen chip, you probably won’t need the 12 core Ryzen 9 3900X, or even the Ryzen 7. From our testing, the Ryzen 5 3600X is the sweet spot for most consumers, especially gamers. Let’s put this claim to the test:

Test Bench

  • Motherboard: ASRock X570 Taichi
  • Memory: Trident Z Royal 8GB x 2 @ 1800MHz CL16
  • Graphics Card: NVIDIA RTX 2080 Super
  • Power Supply: Corsair HX1000i
  • All games were tested at 1080p using the highest in-game preset other than Ghost Recon which was benchmarked at the “Very High” preset.
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  • AMD Ryzen 3 3300X Review: The New Budget Gaming King

AMD Ryzen 5 3600X vs R7 3700X vs R9 3900X: Gaming Benchmarks

The Ryzen 9 3900X has superior lows throughout the benchmark run, but the deltas are too small to call it a definitive lead. In terms of the average frame rates, the three chips perform within 2-3% of each other…across all eleven titles. This suggests that most games fail to utilize more than 6 cores and at this point, the core clocks are the primary bottleneck.

If you are looking to build a gaming PC, the Ryzen 5 3600X is clearly the best value-for-money option. If your workloads are more versatile, then going for a Ryzen 7 3700X isn’t a bad idea either. Most modern applications scale well up to 8 cores, after that, you’ll see notable gains only in professional workloads such as rendering and video editing. We’ll be doing a similar test with Intel’s 9th Gen and the soon-to-release 10th Gen CPUs as well. Stay tuned!

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!

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