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AMD Ryzen 5 3600, Followed by the 5600X was the Most Popular CPU in Russia in Q1 2021

AMD’s Zen 2 based Ryzen 5 36000 continued to be the most popular processor among Russians, with a total share of 9.7% as per the Yandex market. The average selling price of the hex-core chip in the country is 14,800 rubles, a drop of 7% over the last month. The newly launched Ryzen 5 5600X followed shortly behind, overtaking Intel’s Core i5-10400F, showing a strong improvement in the supply of the Zen 3 chips. At present, the 5600X is priced at 26,500 rubles, with an overall share of 7.6%. The much cheaper 10400F (ASP of 17,500 rubles) dropped to the third spot with a share of 5.9%.

Most popular CPUs in Russia in Feb 2021 (Source: Yandex market)

The Ryzen 7 5800X, another Zen 3 chip was the fourth bestselling CPU in Russia with a market share of 5.1%, inches behind the 10400F, despite having a much higher (average) price of 37,800 rubles. The Intel Core i5-10600KF, its nearest rival dropped by several places, with a share of just under 3% in the first quarter of 2021 (and an ASP of 17,500 rubles).

AMD’s flagship sixteen core processor, the Ryzen 9 5950X also saw increased demand with a market share identical to the 10600KF in Feb. It was much more popular than the 12-core Ryzen 9 5900X and the 10-core i9-10850K which accounted for just 1.3% and 2.3% of the market, respectively.

Source

Looking at the market from a distance, AMD continued to hold a small lead over Intel, with the latter consistently regaining lost fortunes in the last few months. At the end of Feb, AMD’s CPU market share was down from 54% to 52.4%, likely a result of persisting 7nm shortages. However, seeing the rapid increase in the supply in the last couple of weeks, we expect Team Red to resume its offensive, at least, till Rocket Lake hits the market.

Source: 3DNews

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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