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AMD Ryzen 4000 Powered ASUS TUF Gaming Laptops Claim #1 Rank on SiSoft Benchmark Database

AMD’s Ryzen 4000 powered gaming laptops are finally up for pre-order at multiple outlets, with an estimated shipping date of 16th March. As more and more benchmarks surface, we’ve got a good idea of where the Zen 2 mobile APUs stand in comparison to Intel’s 10th Gen lineup.

In general, the Ryzen 4000 “Renoir” chips beat the 14nm Comet Lake parts in both the single-threaded and multi-threaded workloads. However, the 10nm Ice Lake CPUs manage to eke out a win in single-threaded benchmarks on account of their higher IPC and the AVX-512 capabilities.

Now, _rogame has shared the final SiSoft benchmarks of the Ryzen 7 4800H powered ASUS TUF Gaming laptop. The high-end Renoir APU secures the top spot in four notebook CPU tests, namely Processor Arithmetic, Processor Multi-Media, Image Processing and Processor Financial Analysis (Double Precision Compute):

As you can see, the Ryzen 7 4800H beats Intel’s top-end Core i9 mobile chips and snatches the top spot in the notebook space, a first for AMD. Earlier, the Core i9-8950HK and the i7-9750H held the first two spots in processor arithmetic and media, respectively while the six-core Xeon E-2276M was the fastest chip in the double-precision based Financial Analysis test.

45W H LineupCores/ThreadsBase ClockBoost ClockL2L3GPU CUsTDP
Ryzen 9 4900HS8/162.8GHz4.4GHz4MB8MB9CUs35W
Ryzen 9 4900H8/162.8GHz4.4GHz4MB8MB8CUs45W
Ryzen 7 4800H8/ 162900MHz4200MHz4MB8MB7CUs45 W
Ryzen 7 4800HS8/162900MHz4200MHz4MB8MB7CUs35 W
Ryzen 5 4600H6/123000MHz4000MHz3MB8MB6CUs45 W

The Ryzen 7 4800H beats the Intel competitors by a sound margin across all three tests to reign supreme among mobile processors. Considering that the Renoir lineup features the first octa-core mobility SKUs, this isn’t all that surprising. Furthermore, as the Ryzen 9 4900HS is even faster than the 4800H, we expect a few more benchmark records to break in the coming days. We’ll keep you posted!

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Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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