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AMD Ryzen 3 3300X Review: The New Budget Gaming King

Today, we’ll be having a look at the Ryzen 3 3300X, after a month-long delay. The review will consist of our standard 11-game benchmark suite comparing the 3300X with the older members of the Matisse family as well as contemporary Intel parts. The second section will comprise of content creation and productivity benchmarks such as Cinebench, V-ray, Kraken, 7-zip, etc. Let’s begin:

Test Bench

  • GPU: NVIDIA RTX 2080 Super FE
  • Motherboard: ASRock X570 Taichi
  • RAM: G.Skill Trident Z Royal 8GB x 2 @ 3600MHz CL16
  • Storage: WD Black 4TB
  • PSU: Corsair HX1000i

AMD Ryzen 3 3300X vs 3100

Before we head on the benchmarks, I’d like to talk a bit about the Ryzen 3 family. On paper, the only difference between the two is with respect to the operating clocks. However, in reality, the CCX configuration or topography of the 3100 and 3300X are completely different.

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While the 3100 combines two active CCXs with two cores active in each, the 3300X uses just a single CCX with all four cores active and the other CCX is disabled. This means that the latter features tighter core-to-core latencies and a unified 16MB L3 cache chunk, resulting in better gaming performance. You can read more about the differences between the two CPUs here.

AMD Ryzen 3 3300X: Gaming Benchmarks

Comparing the Ryzen 3 3300X against the Ryzen 5 3600X, 3700X, and 3900X, it’s glaring to see that most games still fail to make proper use of higher-end CPUs. The averages of all four processors are within 5% of one another, and while the lows are superior for the 8-core and 12-core parts, the deltas aren’t really significantly. This just shows how little progress games have really made on this front, most likely due to the Jaguar cores powering the present-gen consoles. We expect this will change with the next-generation consoles which are based on AMD’s Zen 2 cores.

Benchmarks continue on the next page

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Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it suffered from many internal weaknesses. Left and now working on Hardware Times, a site purely dedicated to. Processor architectures and in-depth benchmarks. That's what we do here at Hardware Times!
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