GamingGPUsNews

AMD Radeon RX 6700 XT Specs and Block Diagrams Detailed

Thanks to info from @patrickschur and stblr on Reddit, @locuza was able to predict the specifications of the Navi 22 (Navy Flounder) die powering the Radeon RX 6700 and the 6700 XT. Although the core details such as the shader count, VRAM buffer, and the bus width were already known, we now know the fine-grained details such as the geometry, front-end, and ROP (backend) compatibilities:

Navi 21 vs Navi 22

The primary differences compared to Navi 21 (other than the lower WGPs) is with respect to the geometry/primitive units (half as much) and the TMUs which get a big cut from 320 to 160, bringing the texture fill-rate down to just 400GTex/s (from 720). The render backend (ROP) capabilities are also reduced, being slightly more than half: 128 vs 64/288GPix/s vs 160GPix/s. As already reported several times earlier, the L3 (Infinity Cache) has been reduced from 128MB to 96MB.

Navi 10

In comparison to Navi 10, we’re looking at roughly the same shader horsepower with 2560 shaders and 40 CUs or 20 WGPs. The ROP count is the same, but thanks to the new RDNA 2 design it should be a fair bit faster than Navi 10. The bus width has been reduced from 256-bit to 192-bit and the Infinity Cache has been added to account for the drop in bandwidth. Another interesting bit is with respect to the geometry engine. The Navi 10 die features the same number of primitive units as Navi 21. This is mainly because of the advanced DX12 features such as mesh shading that reduces the load by early culling of primitives. Navi 22, therefore, features half as many geometry units compared to Navi 10.

AMD is expected to announce the Radeon RX 6700 XT series on the 3rd of March, although as you may have already suspected, the supply won’t hold.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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