GamingGPUsNews

AMD Radeon RX 6600 XT to Cost $349, RX 6600 at $299 [Rumor]

AMD’s Radeon RX 6600 XT (and its non-XT version) will be one of the last graphics cards of this generation, not that it matters much since it’s been hard to actually purchase anything this cycle. It’ll go up against NVIDIA’s GeForce RTX 3060 and 3060 Ti, performing somewhere in between the two, with a price tag of $349 for the XT variant and $299 for the non-XT. According to a report from Neowin, AMD will price the Radeon RX 6600 XT at an MSRP of $349, with a raster performance higher than the RTX 3060 but lower than its Ti sibling.

The ray-tracing performance is unsurprisingly expected to be on par with the RTX 3060, if not worse. AMD was reportedly planning to price the 6600 XT at $369 but eventually decided against it on account of the lower memory buffer. It’s going to be the first RDNA 2 graphics card with a VRAM capacity of less than 12GB. The RX 6800/6900 series comes with 16GB of GDDR6 memory while the RX 6700 XT packs 12GB.

In addition to this, it’ll feature a puny 128-bit bus along with an Infinity Cache (L3) size of just 32MB. As such, this card will be almost exclusively aimed at 1080p gaming. Both the RTX 3060 and 3060 Ti feature a much wider 256-bit bus, making them much more capable at 1440p in comparison. In terms of compute, the 6600 XT is powered by 32 Compute Units or 16 Work Group Processors resulting in 2,048 stream processors (cores).

Moving onto the RX 6600, it’s going to be based on a cut-down Navi 23 die with 28 Compute Units (14 WGPs) or 1,792 stream processors. The memory sub-system is going to be the same as the XT variant. It will be priced at $299, with raster performance somewhat lower than the $329 RTX 3060.

The outlet further alleges that the availability of the Radeon RX 6000 desktop GPUs will continue to be relatively poor, with the bulk of the supply being allocated for the mobile parts, namely the RX 6600M and 6700M.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.

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