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AMD Actively Stopping Board Partners from Releasing Ryzen 5000 Support on X370 Motherboards

Processor support on AMD’s AM4 based chipsets has been rather dicey over the last few years. The company supported the Zen 2 based Ryzen 3000 processors across a wide range of platforms including the 400 and 300 series boards, in addition to the then launched X570 chipsets. However, shortly before the launch of the Ryzen 5000 lineup, the company decided to pull the plug on the X470 and B450 boards (used by the majority of the company’s consumers at the time). Although the decision was eventually reversed, AMD never quite went to supporting the wide range of chipsets across all its processor lineups as it used to.

Hi Jörg,

Unfortunately, we received AMD’s warning that X370 shouldn’t support Vermeer CPU.
Obviously, some customer didn’t operate it under table, AMD noticed it and said ASRock shouldn’t do this anymore.

The attached file is BIOS and it is the last BIOS that I can provide you, please pass it to the user under the table.

Thanks,

HardwareLuxx Forums

A forum post on HardwareLuxx has revealed that AMD has been actively stopping its board partners from bringing Zen 3 support to pre-400 series boards such as the X370. This is despite the fact that many modders have proved that the 300 series chipsets, including the paltry A320 can support the Ryzen 5000 (Vermeer) chips on a hardware level. All that is required is some firmware-level support from the OEMs.

However, OEMs can’t go against AMD’s orders as it might result in restrictions, including delayed delivery of firmware and other essential updates. While this decision is understandable from a business and PR perspective, however, users who don’t stand to benefit from the features of the newer platforms shouldn’t be forced to upgrade without any genuine reason.

Areej

Computer Engineering dropout (3 years), writer, journalist, and amateur poet. I started my first technology blog, Techquila while in college to address my hardware passion. Although largely successful, it was a classic example of too many people trying out multiple different things but getting nothing done. Left in late 2019 and been working on Hardware Times ever since.
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